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Together, ensuring a vibrant and healthy future for Mt. Tam

 

Our Work

Our Work

One Tam Projects & Programs

One Tam combines the skills and resources of its five partners to support work that is vital to the health of the mountain, enriches the experience of its visitors, and inspires and educates a new generation of stewards. Our combined efforts include ecological restoration, trail improvements, wayfinding signage, wildlife monitoring, volunteer and youth programs,
and more.

You can learn more about our work, and how you can get involved, through the links below.

Bothin Marsh
With climate change and sea level rise, flooding is increasing in frequency and duration throughout Bothin Marsh - this project is creating a shared community vision for its future.
Wayfinding Signs & Kiosks
This project is improving signage and informational kiosks at trailheads and intersections across the mountain for a safer and more enjoyable visit.
Redwood Creek Trail Realignment
The proposed trail project, with 1.1 miles of realignment and two new bridges over the stream, will provide passage for horses and pedestrians and protect the creek and its inhabitants.
Redwood Creek Juvenile Coho Habitat Restoration
This project will remove a portion of the rock riprap currently lining Redwood Creek's banks, allowing the creek to form natural habitat features so desperately needed for juvenile salmon survival.
Bat Monitoring
Seldom seen and poorly studied, the lives and habits of Marin County’s bats are largely a mystery. However, bats are actually tremendously important parts of our communities.
Community Stewardship Program
From naturalist walks and talks, volunteer workdays, immersive summer high school programs, community science opportunities, and internships for local youth, our stewardship programs aim to care for Mt. Tam while engaging and deepening the community's relationship to the to the mountain.
Workshops & Conferences
Workshops and conferences help bring actionable research to land managers, and provide a forum for sharing knowledge, experience and information with each other and with interested stakeholders and community members.
Rare Plant Program
This program helps coordinate data management, mapping, monitoring, and research, and be able to look beyond their borders to rare plant conservation across the mountain.
Roving Ranger & Pop-up Trailheads
The One Tam Roving Ranger brings the mountain to you – and continually offers new activities and ways to engage with the mountain and learn about our local environment.
Large-scale Inventories & Monitoring
A comprehensive, big-picture view of the mountain’s resources will allow managers to prioritize restoration and protection efforts and allocate resources in new ways.
Invasive Plant Monitoring & Management
This program builds on successful existing models to find and eliminate priority weeds and engage volunteers in caring for Mt. Tam.
Conservation Management Team
A field-based One Tam Conservation Management Team provides an essential and borderless support structure for various facets of conservation science, monitoring, and management, and helps foster a common and coordinated approach for all of Mt. Tam.
Internship Program
The One Tam Internship Program expands the capacity of existing stewardship programs while providing career pathways and job skills for local youth and young adults.
Deer Park Fire Road & Dipsea Trail Rehabilitation
This project will restore the natural drainage patterns throughout the trail corridor, reducing the sediment flowing into Redwood Creek as well as creating safe and sustainable trail alignments to protect natural resources and visitor access well into the future.
Potrero Meadow Restoration

Potrero Meadow provides a lush open area amidst the forest canopy to the north of Mt. Tam’s iconic peaks.

Forest Health & Resiliency
First seen in Marin County in the mid-1990s, Sudden Oak Death (SOD) has resulted in the death of millions of oak and tanoak trees in California and Oregon. This project will examine how different forestry practices affect carbon sequestration, water yield, and reforestation potential in SOD-infested areas.
Wildlife Picture Index
The One Tam partner agencies are using motion-activated cameras to study wildlife on public lands around Mt. Tam.
West Peak Restoration
Coastal Indian tribes called Tamalpais home for 5,000 years, and it was so sacred to the Miwok that they would not climb to the summit.
Youth Programs
The One Tam Youth Initiative engages, empowers, and educates young people while providing critical support for the lands of Mt. Tam.