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How healthy are Mt. Tam's natural resources?

 

Reptiles & Amphibians

Reptiles & Amphibians

California Red-legged Frog

California Red-legged Frog

The overall condition is Good.

Foothill Yellow-legged Frog

Foothill Yellow-legged Frog

The current condition is Poor.

Western Pond Turtle

Western Pond Turtle

The overall current condition is Good.

The Health of Mt. Tam's Reptiles & Amphibians

Thin-skinned, long-lived, and totally dependent on aquatic habitats for part of their lives, amphibians are good indicators of stream, pond, and wetland conditions. They are sensitive to changes in hydrology and precipitation, as well as to invasive species, pollutants, and toxins. Some reptiles are similarly responsive to aquatic habitat conditions, and may be good indicators of the health of the terrestrial habitats they live in as well.

 

The images and links below provide more information about the condition and trends of these three species on Mt. Tam.

Overall Health

Although there has been no comprehensive survey of reptiles or amphibiansin the One Tam area of focus, land managers have enough data to assess the condition and trend for three species that have been the target of specific monitoring programs.

 

Now eliminated from 70 percent of their former range, federally threatened California red-legged frogs (Rana draytonii) are now primarily found in coastal drainages from Marin County south to San Simeon. On Mt. Tam, they live in the Olema Creek Watershed, and at Muir Beach where they have made a remarkable recovery in recent years thanks to habitat restoration efforts there.

 

The foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii) may be found in streams from Oregon south to Los Angeles County, including at elevations up to 6,300 feet in the Sierra Nevadas. This species is now only found across half of their historical range, and has experienced a severe drop in numbers in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Marin Municipal Water District has been monitoring foothill yellow-legged frogs since 2004, and has implemented restoration projects and other protection measures for them within the One Tam area of focus.

 

Western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) have declined dramatically throughout the state in recent decades. The few representatives of this species found at Muir Beach in the early 1990s have disappeared. However, Marin Municipal Water District lakes host populations of western pond turtles, which have been the focus of monitoring programs since 2004.

 

 

Health Score
Condition, Trend & Confidence

california red-legged frog

  • Condition: Good
  • Trend: No Change
  • Confidence: Moderate

 

foothill yellow-legged frog

  • Condition: Significant Concern
  • Trend: No Change
  • Confidence: High

 

western pond turtle

  • Condition: Good
  • Trend: No Change
  • Confidence: High

 

Reptile & Amphibian Species in the One Tam Area of Focus

Life Form

Scientific Name

Common Name

Frogs

Lithobates catesbeianus

American Bullfrog

Frogs

Pseudacris sierra

Sierran Treefrog (Pacific Treefrog)

Frogs

Rana boylii

Foothill Yellow-legged Frog

Frogs

Rana draytonii

California Red-legged Frog

Newts

Taricha granulosa

Rough-skinned Newt

Newts

Taricha torosa ssp. torosa

Coast Range Newt

Salamanders

Aneides lugubris

Arboreal Salamander

Salamanders

Batrachoseps attenuatus

California Slender Salamander

Salamanders

Dicamptodon ensatus

California Giant Salamander

Salamanders

Ensatina eschscholtzii

Ensatina

Salamanders

Ensatina eschscholtzii ssp. xanthoptica

Yellow-eyed Ensatina

Toads

Anaxyrus boreas ssp. halophilus

California Toad

Lizards

Elgaria coerulea ssp. coerulea

San Francisco Alligator Lizard

Lizards

Elgaria multicarinata ssp. multicarinata

California Alligator Lizard

Lizards

Plestiodon skiltonianus ssp. skiltonianus

Skilton's Skink

Lizards

Sceloporus occidentalis ssp. bocourtii

Coast Range Fence Lizard

Snakes

Charina bottae

Northern Rubber Boa

Snakes

Coluber constrictor ssp. mormon

Western Yellow-bellied Racer

Snakes

Crotalus oreganus ssp. oreganus

Northern Pacific Rattlesnake

Snakes

Diadophis punctatus ssp. amabilis

Pacific Ring-necked Snake

Snakes

Lampropeltis getula ssp. californiae

California Kingsnake

Snakes

Pituophis catenifer ssp. catenifer

Pacific Gopher Snake

Snakes

Thamnophis atratus

Aquatic Gartersnake

Snakes

Thamnophis elegans ssp. terrestris

Coast Gartersnake

Snakes

Thamnophis sirtalis ssp. infernalis

California Red-sided Gartersnake

Turtles

Actinemys marmorata

Pacific Pond Turtle

Turtles

Pseudemys concinna

River cooter

Turtles

Trachemys decussata

Cuban Slider

Turtles

Trachemys scripta ssp. elegans

Red-eared Slider

*This species list represents current information compiled by One Tam partner agencies at this time, and will likely be updated in the future through further review of additional technical reports, inventories, and validation of other data sources.

Updated 6/16/16