Mt. Tam

Coho Salmon in Lagunitas Creek

What is Healthy?

The desired conditions for the Lagunitas Creek coho salmon populations are described in numerical targets for each life stage, as well as the critical habitat conditions that support those life stages. The National Fish and Wildlife Service (NMFS) recovery plan for this species (NMFS, 2012) lists specific goals for the number of adult spawners and redds (nests), juveniles, and smolts (young fish migrating out to sea), and the amount of woody debris in the stream.

North American River Otter

What is Healthy?

North American river otters are present in all suitable water bodies in the One Tam area of focus.

California Red-legged Frog

What is Healthy?

As recommended by USFWS recovery plan (2002), the goal is to have the long-term population trend of California red-legged frogs unchanged or increasing. Additionally, there would be no non-native predators within two miles of California red-legged frog breeding sites.

Northern Spotted Owl

What is Healthy?

A healthy population of Northern Spotted Owls on Mt. Tam would remain stable or increase over time. Additionally, existing high levels of pair occupancy and fecundity would be maintained within the observed normal range of variability, or above long-term average values based on monitoring data. Lastly, the threat from Barred Owls would remain low.

Steelhead Trout

What is Healthy?

Living in both estuarine and stream habitats that vary in depth, velocity, temperature, and shelter, steelhead are not as dependent on stream habitat conditions for survival as coho salmon. To persist indefinitely, steelhead trout should occupy more locations in the Mt. Tam area of focus and should migrate to the ocean in numbers sufficient to allow a viable number of adult steelhead to return each year and spawn. The National Fish and Wildlife Service recovery plan for this species (NMFS, 2012) lists specific goals for numbers of spawners and redds (nests), and smolts (young fish migrating out to sea).

Coho Salmon in Redwood Creek

What is Healthy?

The desired conditions for Redwood Creek coho salmon populations are described in numerical targets for each life stage, as well as the critical habitat conditions that support those life stages. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) recovery plan for this species (2012) lists specific goals for the number of adult spawners and redds (nests), juveniles, and smolts (young fish migrating out to sea), and the amount of woody debris in the stream.

Native Mammal Diversity

What is Healthy?

The full suite of expected native mammals is present, and there are no non-native mammals. Rare species are also found in suitable habitat types. MWPIP occupancy estimates are stable and indicate that all tropic levels (from small prey species to large predators) are represented at appropriate scales.

Osprey

What is Healthy?

A healthy nesting population of Osprey on Mt. Tam would remain stable over time. High levels of pair occupancy and annual reproductive success would be maintained within the normal range of variability, or above long-term average values based on recent historical monitoring.

Shrublands

What is Healthy?

The persistence of large, contiguous (30 acres or greater in size), weed-free blocks of shrublands that provide habitat for shrubland-dependent plant and wildlife species that are sensitive to edge effects and fragmentation.

Sargent Cypress

What is Healthy?

Maintain more than 360 acres of Sargent cypress communities at the current spatial extent in the One Tam area of focus, supporting the current species richness and structural diversity, and with natural recruitment of Sargent cypress saplings and minimal invasive species.

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